The Impasse

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The Impasse

In any survey of the relationship between the Church and the Synagogue—their respective communities—through history, the report would declare a tumultuous history. Any case of graduated tensions mentions ambivalence, and those exceptions are rarely surpassed with friendliness. Though the suffering Savior “abolished in His flesh the enmity between” Jew and Gentile,[1] one is hard-pressed to find historical tranquility between Jew and Christian...

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A Blustery Monday

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A Blustery Monday

“In the almost fifty years that I have worked as a doctor, I have hardly ever seen a man die so entirely submissive to the will of God.”

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Why Every Calvinist Should be a Premillenialist

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Why Every Calvinist Should be a Premillenialist

"We are in the middle of a study of eschatology, focusing on Israel. We are at the beginning of the bigger study of eschatology, but kind of in the middle of studying the role that Israel plays in eschatology. If you wonder what eschatology is, that is a long word, it basically means the study of last things, from the Greek word eschaton which means last things. What does the Bible say about the end of the world? What does the Bible say about the end of history? What has God planned for the end? ..."

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Contention & Complexity: The Dangers of Zionism and Lack Thereof

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Contention & Complexity: The Dangers of Zionism and Lack Thereof

If the arguments and mud swirling and slinging around Jerusalem were simply about soil—dirt—or a geopolitical tension in the Middle East along with every other war and fractured boundary line in the bleeding Arab world, we’d leave it well alone. If the consequences of these ideologies hadn’t historically resulted in genocide and political partnership with a pagan nation, we’d leave it well alone. If the Judeo-Christian Scriptures were silent on the future of this people, land, nation and city, we’d leave it well alone... Trouble is...

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Our Duty to Israel

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Our Duty to Israel

In 1839, the Church of Scotland dispatched a delegation of four ministers to investigate the condition of Jewish communities throughout Europe and the land of Palestine. While M'Cheyne was away, W.C. Burns pastored M'Cheyne's parish in his stead, and the LORD visited their fellowship with power. M'Cheyne and his colleagues were convinced blessing had come as they blessed Abraham's sons, and convicted they should spearhead new efforts to honor the Jews with their Gospel.

He preached the following upon return,
17 November 1839.

 

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Anti-Semitism: A Little Considered Root

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Anti-Semitism: A Little Considered Root

My comment: This is paradoxically the inverse consequence of that which is intended for blessing. It underlies and compounds all grievances in those who should have been the recipients of God-intended blessings—grievances, conscious or unconscious, that can be kindled unto rage! That rage, I am suggesting, is called anti-Semitism.  It has haunted us as a people throughout our history [even prior to the advent of Christendom] to the present day. Can it, considering the text, be viewed as judgment? Judgment, not only in the punitive sense but in the redemptive, in that it should act as a spur to restore us in our call to the nations to “bless all the families of the earth”; to be that priestly nation that teaches the people the difference between the sacred and the profane; not only by our words, but, necessarily, by our example?

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